Shop Old World History

Old World Wisconsin will reopen for general admission in April 2023.

While you wait, learn more about the site’s history, and take home a piece of the past, with the Old World Wisconsin collection in our online store.

Shop Old World History

Old World Wisconsin will reopen for general admission in April 2023.

While you wait, learn more about the site’s history, and take home a piece of the past, with the Old World Wisconsin collection in our online store.

Travel Through Time and the Stories of America’s Heartland

Experience the world of Wisconsin’s early immigrants at Old World Wisconsin.  Step into the daily lives of the people who called this world home as you help with chores and cooking, try your hand at crafts and trades, and play – yes, even the grown-ups! Help stoke the fire in the blacksmith shop, say hi to the farm animals, pick veggies in the gardens, dye and spin wool, roll pie crusts, collect chicken eggs, try on wooden clogs, race high-wheel bicycles, and sample tasty beer in the Brewhouse. This is where history comes alive! 

MORE TIME FOR FUN!

Planning your visit is easier than ever with advance online ticketing. Purchase your tickets today and make more time for fun on your next adventure.


MARK YOUR CALENDAR

The five fermentation vats (one for each day of brewing during the summer season) and kegs shown as equipment is moved into the new Brewhouse at Old World Wisconsin in preparation for the June 2022 grand opening events. Taken 2.24.22 by Dan Freas

The Brewhouse

Now Open!

From large breweries to corner bars, big labels to modern microbrews, beermaking is a huge part of Wisconsin’s culture and heritage.

HAVE YOU HEARD?!

Old World Wisconsin has been voted the #1 place to take kids in the Milwaukee area! Travel through time and experience the stories of America’s heartland with hand-on activities and fun for the whole family!


NEW ARRIVALS: A CAMPAIGN

A newly constructed Brewing Experience building, combined with relocated historic Wittnebel’s Tavern and a festive outdoor Beer Garden, will allow Old World Wisconsin guests to celebrate Wisconsin’s brewing traditions like never before.

CREATING AN IMMERSIVE WELCOME EXPERIENCE AT OLD WORLD WISCONSIN

The Wisconsin Historical Society is excited to open the brand new Brewhouse at Old World Wisconsin in 2022. This building is just the first new structure completed as part of a $5.5 million project that represents the first two phases of a larger, multi-year master plan to transform the site’s entry area with a reimagined Welcome Experience.

Best Deal in History!

Becoming a member is the best way to explore Wisconsin history. Members get free admission to our historic sites and discounts on special events!


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Old World Wisconsin

Old World Wisconsin

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Stories of early immigrant settlers come to life as you explore homes, farms, and gardens at this han

Guests of Old World Wisconsin enjoy beautiful prairies during our summer season at Old World Wisconsin. We have both remnant and restored prairies on-site. Remnant prairies are small areas never tilled by farmers that still exist as they did centuries ago.

Restored prairies are areas that used to grow crops but now are replanted with appropriate prairie species for our region. Staff and volunteers maintain these gorgeous natural areas throughout the site. July and August are particularly beautiful times for prairies in Wisconsin.

Plan a trip now for this summer to enjoy these gems of our history and present day here at Old World Wisconsin.
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16 hours ago
Guests of Old World Wisconsin enjoy beautiful prairies during our summer season at Old World Wisconsin.  We have both remnant and restored prairies on-site.  Remnant prairies are small areas never tilled by farmers that still exist as they did centuries ago. 

Restored prairies are areas that used to grow crops but now are replanted with appropriate prairie species for our region.  Staff and volunteers maintain these gorgeous natural areas throughout the site.  July and August are particularly beautiful times for prairies in Wisconsin.  

Plan a trip now for this summer to enjoy these gems of our history and present day here at Old World Wisconsin.

Comment on Facebook

It has been disappointing to see the restored prairie and Aldo Leopold Trail between the Ramsey Barn and the Caldwell Hall has been allowed to be come overgrown with trees and scrubs since the the tornado.

Thank you for doing this and being responsible caretakers of the land.

This Old Building Saturday!

One of the most iconic buildings at Old World Wisconsin is the 1860’s Pomeranian house, owned by the Schulz family for over two decades in the late 19th century. The house was relocated to Old World and restored a couple years after the OWW opening in 1976.

One of the most asked questions at OWW by our guests is ‘what is a Pomeranian?’. While the name for many conjures the image of a small, fluffy dog, a Pomeranian is someone who was from the region of Pomerania. Historically, the region lies along the southern Baltic Sea coast, and today that area is split between Poland and Germany.

The Schulz house is an exceptional example of traditional Germanic architecture. Notably, it has the unique feature of a schwarze kuche, or black kitchen. The schwarze kuche, is an open hearth that is enclosed on all sides by mud-brick walls. The walls surrounding the hearth were blackened by the soot of the fire, which is how this style of kitchen got its name. The purpose of this one large central hearth was to keep the rest of the house free from smoke, while also lessening the danger of disastrous fires in the house. Black kitchens were a Pomeranian tradition that was beginning to fade away by the 1850s, and was used for general cooking, heating the house, smoking meats in the chimney space, and baking bread in the attached bread oven. With advances in cast iron ovens, black kitchens were rarely constructed in Wisconsin. There were four known to have existed, and only one remaining today in Wisconsin.

The house was built by carpenters skilled in the traditional European Fachwerk technique that featured a half-timbered framework built around a massive masonry chimney/hearth. Fachwerk building was not only common to Pomerania, but also to most of Europe. Wood was a limited resource in Germany, and although the forests of Wisconsin offered vast forests building material, Pomeranian immigrants held on to their traditional style of construction. The frame was hewn from oak and chinked with clay and flax straw. The roof is made of cedar wood shingles, a Yankee influence, rather than the traditional straw thatching.
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2 days ago
This Old Building Saturday!

One of the most iconic buildings at Old World Wisconsin is the 1860’s Pomeranian house, owned by the Schulz family for over two decades in the late 19th century. The house was relocated to Old World and restored a couple years after the OWW opening in 1976. 

One of the most asked questions at OWW by our guests is ‘what is a Pomeranian?’. While the name for many conjures the image of a small, fluffy dog, a Pomeranian is someone who was from the region of Pomerania. Historically, the region lies along the southern Baltic Sea coast, and today that area is split between Poland and Germany.  

The Schulz house is an exceptional example of traditional Germanic architecture. Notably, it has the unique feature of a schwarze kuche, or black kitchen. The schwarze kuche, is an open hearth that is enclosed on all sides by mud-brick walls. The walls surrounding the hearth were blackened by the soot of the fire, which is how this style of kitchen got its name. The purpose of this one large central hearth was to keep the rest of the house free from smoke, while also lessening the danger of disastrous fires in the house. Black kitchens were a Pomeranian tradition that was beginning to fade away by the 1850s, and was used for general cooking, heating the house, smoking meats in the chimney space, and baking bread in the attached bread oven. With advances in cast iron ovens, black kitchens were rarely constructed in Wisconsin. There were four known to have existed, and only one remaining today in Wisconsin. 

The house was built by carpenters skilled in the traditional European Fachwerk technique that featured a half-timbered framework built around a massive masonry chimney/hearth. Fachwerk building was not only common to Pomerania, but also to most of Europe. Wood was a limited resource in Germany, and although the forests of Wisconsin offered vast forests building material, Pomeranian immigrants held on to their traditional style of construction. The frame was hewn from oak and chinked with clay and flax straw. The roof is made of cedar wood shingles, a Yankee influence, rather than the traditional straw thatching.Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

My great great great great grandparents owned this home. My parents took us to Old World Wisconsin many times as a kid to see this house, and my kids enjoy going there too now.

Later owned by the Zirbel family! My mom was a Zirbel and visited the home as it was a relative and neighbor!

I love this place. When I lived in that neck of the woods, I visited often.

My uncle and his family lived there at one time. Also my dad's family came from Pomerania.

My ancestors came from Pomerania. When I walked into the Schulz house for the first time my hair stood on end. Ancient DNA.

My Pomeranian relation were Stark. They came to Milwaukee near the turn of the century.

I was working there alone one fall (probably 1981) and heard footsteps on the porch. Went to greet visitors and no one was there! I don't believe in ghosts, but.....

Interesting to read! Thanks for sharing

My wife's fraternal great grandparents came from Pomerania and settled in the rural Brillion, WI area.

I love Old World!!!

Wasn’t this section labeled a German farm in the early days of Old World? Why the change?

This is one of my favorite houses at OWW. This one & the schoolhouse.

One of my favorites ❤️❤️

Haven’t been inside it in a while. The last time I was there only a few homes were open

Love this house. So handsome.

One of my favorite houses to work in.

Looking forward to visiting OWW this year!

You spell Schulz and Schultz in this post. Do you know which it is? I am a Schulz

Where was this home originally located?

Emily Zytkiewicz Sarah Williams

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Introducing one of our newest farm friends, a gorgeous Cotswold Sheep!

This good boy was brought back to Old World Wisconsin after being named first place yearling ram (first place in his age group!) at the National show in Louisville, KY back in November. He comes from the Meyer Family in Arenzville, IL, who are generally regarded as one of the most important flocks in the United States.

We are so grateful to the Old World Foundation for making this possible, and for their support of our Heritage Breed Program at Old World Wisconsin. Thanks to this support, we are able to continue protecting and teaching our guests about these rare, often endangered, breeds that have been a part of the lives of those in Wisconsin and the Upper Midwest since the beginning.

He has been adjusting to his new home and new friends well over the last two months. When asked, it was joked that he "enjoys long walks on the beach and playing bridge with his Merino buddies!"

We are so excited for guests to get a look at him when we open in May!
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3 days ago
Introducing one of our newest farm friends, a gorgeous Cotswold Sheep!

This good boy was brought back to Old World Wisconsin after being named first place yearling ram (first place in his age group!) at the National show in Louisville, KY back in November. He comes from the Meyer Family in Arenzville, IL, who are generally regarded as one of the most important flocks in the United States.

We are so grateful to the Old World Foundation for making this possible, and for their support of our Heritage Breed Program at Old World Wisconsin. Thanks to this support, we are able to continue protecting and teaching our guests about these rare, often endangered, breeds that have been a part of the lives of those in Wisconsin and the Upper Midwest since the beginning.

He has been adjusting to his new home and new friends well over the last two months. When asked, it was joked that he enjoys long walks on the beach and playing bridge with his Merino buddies! 

We are so excited for guests to get a look at him when we open in May!Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

Such a handsome fellow.! We are happy that we can support the Heritage Breed Program.

Where will he be for us to see at OWW?

Many Summers ago, I worked the Kvaale Farm and learned to spin and knit. Now I have a flock of my own!

So if we're going to have a breeding program want to be smart to have the female too or is this going to be on the breeding programs where he doesn't actually breed

We need guides at 🤕 Old World WI

We moved 12 years ago but I still miss working at OWW.

Has he got a NAME? He is gorgeous ❤️🐏

Love him.

Beautiful!

Toni Martin Ric Isaacson

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